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U.S.S. CanberraPrint Page Print this page

06-February-2015 [Russell Byers]
06-February-2015 [Russell Byers]

Photographs supplied by Glen Yeomans / Russell Byers

The plaque commemorates the personnel who died in service or were killed in action when serving on the United States of America warship, U.S.S. Canberra which was torpedoed in 1944 during World War Two.

The plaque location is indicated by the red poppy in the second image. 

U.S.S. Canberra (CA-70/CAG-2) was a Baltimore-class cruiser and later a Boston-class guided missile cruiser of the United States Navy. Originally to be named U.S.S. Pittsburgh, the ship was renamed before launch to honour the loss of the Australian cruiser H.M.A.S. Canberra during the Battle of Savo Island. U.S.S. Canberra was the first United States Navy warship named after a foreign warship or a foreign capital city, the second being U.S.S. Boxer (CV-21)

The ship entered service in 1943, and served in the Pacific theatre of World War Two until she was torpedoed during the Aerial Battle of Taiwan- Okinawa and forced to return to the United States for repairs.


 

 

Location

Address:Fairbairn & Limestone Avenues, Captain Reg Saunders Courtyard, Australian War Memorial, Campbell, 2612
State:ACT
Area:Foreign
GPS Coordinates:Lat: -35.280524
Long: 149.148426
Note: GPS Coordinates are approximate.
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Details

Monument Type:Plaque
Monument Theme:Conflict
Sub-Theme:WW2
Actual Event Start Date:19-October-1944
Actual Event End Date:19-October-1944

Dedication

Actual Monument Dedication Date:Sunday 1st October, 2000
Front Inscription

This plaque commemorates the memory of those who gave their lives for their country when the U.S.S. Canberra, in battle against Japanese Aircraft off the coast of Formosa on October 19, 1944, was torpedoed while operating as a unit of the Third Fleet under Admiral William F. Halsey, US Navy.

 

Source: MA
Monument details supplied by Monument Australia - www.monumentaustralia.org.au
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